Wall Street Journal Oped: The SEC Plans to Collect Too Much Information

By HAL S. SCOTT and JOHN GULLIVER Originally published by the Wall Street Journal on October 2, 2017.

Read More

Committee Submits Comment Letter to Federal Reserve on Proposed Guidance on Supervisory Expectations for Boards of Directors

The Committee submitted a letter to the Federal Reserve (“Fed”) commending the Fed for seeking to clarify supervisory expectations for boards of directors, refocus expectations on boards’ core functions, and distinguish expectations for boards from those of management. The letter noted the Committee’s concern, however, that the Fed’s guidance could be construed as imposing rigid […]

Read More

Op-ed: Shareholders Deserve Right to Choose Mandatory Arbitration

Originally published by the CLS Blue Sky Blog on August 21, 2017 On July 17, SEC Commissioner Michael Piwowar extended an important invitation to U.S. public companies. “For shareholder lawsuits,” Piwowar offered, “companies can come to [the SEC] to ask for relief to put… mandatory arbitration into their charters.” To some, this idea may be unfamiliar […]

Read More

Committee of Experts Proposes Reforms to Establish Framework to Guide Emergency Lending

Professor Hal S. Scott and four economic experts – Charles W. Calomiris, Douglas Holtz-Eakin, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Allan H. Meltzer – published an article in the Journal of Financial Economic Policy entitled “Establishing credible rules for Fed emergency lending.”

Read More

Nothing But the Facts Statement: The Glass-Steagall Act

The Committee on Capital Markets Regulation seeks to provide the public and policymakers with important factual details about the Glass-Steagall Act and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (“GLBA”) to inform an important policy debate. This Nothing But The Facts (“NBTF”) statement explains how the Glass-Steagall Act prohibited commercial banks from directly engaging in certain securities activities and […]

Read More

Washington Post Op-ed: The White House and Lawmakers Want to Reinstate a 1930s Law They Don’t Understand

In recent months, the Trump administration and members of Congress have called for reinstating the Glass-Steagall Act, a Depression-era law that separated commercial banking from investment banking. That would be a serious mistake. Instead, Congress should repeal the Dodd-Frank financial reform’s “Hotel California” provision, which prevents large banks from voluntarily separating their commercial and investment banking activities.

Read More

CNBC Op-ed: The Trump Administration—Not the Fed—Has It Right on Bank Regulation

By HAL S. SCOTT Originally published by CNBC on July 3, 2017 All 34 of the largest banks in the US passed the Federal Reserve’s latest stress tests. The assumptions about GDP and other criteria in the stress tests were “extreme” and “absurd.” The Fed and the Trump administration seem to hold opposite views on bank […]

Read More

Roadmap for Regulatory Reform

The Committee’s Roadmap for Regulatory Reform sets forth priority regulatory actions for the Trump Administration that would promote U.S. economic growth and enhance the stability of the U.S. financial system. We believe that prompt action is necessary because certain regulations implementing the Dodd-Frank Act have stifled U.S. economic growth and policymakers have paid inadequate attention to regulatory measures that would enhance the performance of U.S. capital markets.

Read More

New York Times Op-Ed: To Spur Small Business, First Free the Banks

By HAL S. SCOTT Originally published by The New York Times on May 15, 2017 Somewhere in the United States right now, an entrepreneur is having trouble getting a small-business loan for expansion. The reason? The bank is committed to keeping a large portion of its money in government debt instead. After the financial crisis, […]

Read More

Financial Times Op-Ed: Relax the Rules to Kickstart the Stalled IPO Market

Fast-growing US companies and their investors lose out when they avoid going public.

Read More